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Journal 2004 - Wesley Historical Society

Go to Wesley Historical Society Publications

                                        
Contents

CONTENTS

FOREWORD - Bernie Le Heron

INTRODUCTION TO SUSAN THOMPSON'S WESLEY DINNER ADDRESS - John Salmon

BEING 'AS GOOD AS A WOMAN': WOMEN AT TRINITY METHODIST THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE Wesley Lecture 2002 - Rev. Dr Susan Thompson

BARBARA MILLER : My Spiritual Journey - Rev. Barbara Miller

JILL RICHARDS : My Spiritual Journey - Rev. Jill Richards

A 'LITTLE BETHEL' IN EPSOM, AUCKLAND - Helen B. Laurenson MA

PASSIONFRUIT SUNDAYS - Alwyn Owen

OBITUARY: Rev. Gordon Cornwell

OBITUARY: Michael King

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

ERRATA

MEMBERSHIP NEWS

CONTRIBUTIONS SOUGHT

DIRECTORY 2004

ANNIVERSARIES 2005-2006

Foreword

The major theme in this issue of our Journal is recognition of the status of women in the ministry and the fostering of our understanding of women's application to its demands.

Initially, the admission of women to the Methodist ministry was hesitant, even grudging, but as time went on they proved their worth by means of dedicated disciplined service and exercise of leadership in areas beyond their traditional roles.

Susan Thompson's observant account of the experiences of women in training
exposes the limitations imposed by prevailing paternalistic attitudes evident in the practice of ministerial education in those times.

Things have changed, as demonstrated by such writings as hers, and its commendation by John Salmon.

Barbara Miller and Jill Richards chose to trace personal experiences and
reactions in their 'Spiritual Journeys', thus providing evidence of resolute commitment to service as opportunity presented, and growing confidence and effectiveness in their field of activity.

The 'Little Bethel' article is a useful contribution to local history in Auckland.

Such articles are an ongoing feature of our Journals. But for Helen Laurenson's painstaking fact finding the Epsom Chapel and most of its associations would have disappeared without trace.

Alwyn Owen's 'Passionfruit Sunday' is a delightful 'as I remember' of a former era. I am grateful to N.Z. Memories for provision of the pictures.

My thanks go to all our contributors and others who have worked to make possible once again the publication of our Journal.            

Bernie Le Heron