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Centenary History, Pitt Street Methodist Church, Auckland.

                                            
100 Years in Pitt Street

Contents

FOREWORD  
I BUILDING THE CHURCH  
II EARLY AUCKLAND METHODISM  
III THE DIFFICULT YEARS  
IV MOTHER OF CHURCHES  
V THE EIGHTIES AND NINETIES  
VI VICTORIAN WESLEYANS  
VII A FRESH OUTLOOK FOR A NEW CENTURY  
VIII THE FIRST WORLD WAR AND AFTER  
IX DEPRESSION AND RECOVERY 
X THE CITY CHURCH TODAY 
APPENDICES
INDEX 
 
Foreword

The hundred years' life-time of Pitt Street Methodist Church has witnessed more changes than any other thousand years of the world's history, and this centennial year is also a time of change and development.

Human exploration of outer space continues resolutely, with the immediate target a landing on the moon within the next decade. In the world scene, newly-independent nations experience their political teething-troubles, and there is widespread unrest as under-privileged peoples struggle for their share in the world's prosperity. In an indecisive undeclared war in South-east Asia the people of South Viet Nam are assisted against North Viet Nam by forces from the U.S.A., Australia, New Zealand and others, in a complex military situation in which none can see the end. There is some relief through the ending of "confrontation" between Indonesia and the Malaysian federation of nations.

In New Zealand it is a period of temporary economic recession in the inflationary cycle of credit expansion. The country is engaged in an election campaign. The Methodist Conference is about to meet in Auckland under the Presidency of the Rev. Ashleigh K. Petch.

In this historical survey of the first century in the life of Pitt Street Church the Rev. E. W. Hames has served us well, and the historian's perspective enables the immediate world scene to be surveyed with more objectivity.

A popular saying, "It'll be all the same in a hundred years' time" reminds us that many of our immediate concerns are extremely petty in the long view; but a book such as this should remind us that things never are "the same" - and that human beings have a decisive, if often unimportant, role to play.

We who live and serve in this well-loved church at the year of its centenary are grateful for the heritage into which we entered, and aware of our responsibility to be the church of the living God in the heart of a growing city.

R. F. CLEMENT.