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William Woon 1803-1858 - WHS Publication #97 - 2014





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William Woon 1803-1858
by Gary Clover

CONTENTS

Preface

Introduction

THE SOUTH PACIFIC MISSION FIELD

1. A "GODLY MECHANIC" FROM CORNWALL

2. TWO YEARS. TEN MONTHS IN TONGA

3. A NEW START AT MANGUNGU

4. AT PAPAKAREWA, KAWHIA

5. "PREACHING, PRINTING, PLANTING" AND FULL CONNEXION

6. CHALLENGE AND COMPETITION IN THE HOKIANGA

7. A TRIUMPH, AND TRIALS AND TROUBLES

8. A FATHER AND MOTHER IN ISRAEL

9. DISTRACTIONS AND DECLINE

10. THE END OF THE MISSION

11. FREED FROM AN INDESCRIBABLE BURDEN

12. JANE WOON

13. A "BABE IN THE WOODS"

"[Rev. William Woon,] a native of Truro, Cornwall, was converted to God in early life, when he became a Member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and in due time exercised his gifts as Local Preacher. He entered our Ministry in 1830, and his first appointment was to the Friendly Isles, where he laboured for four years [sic.]. Under the power of temptation he retired for a season. His next station was Mangungu in New Zealand. In after years he was removed to Taranaki where he was in 'labours more abundant'. His health having failed he became a Supernumerary in 1853. From that time he resided in the little town of Wanganui, where he preached on the Sabbath and otherwise made himself useful as far as his strength would permit. During his last Summer he visited Wellington, and appeared much benefited by the change, soon after his return home his old malady reappeared with increased force, and he gently fell asleep in the bosom of his own family. His end was peaceful. His last words were, 'Give my love to all my brethren, I am going to heaven.'" He was "a very acceptable recruit ... with some useful qualities. No man wrote more regularly and faithfully to the Mission authorities, and his letters and diaries are full of interest and sound observations. His printing skill was later to be of immense value to the Mission. ... Woon who was always a prolific writer with an eye for anything of news value, and who evidently wrote with the reading public in mind, gave many details of the work in South Taranaki and Wanganui."