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Journal 2011 - Wesley Historical Society

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JOURNAL 2011
64 pages

Contents

4 EDITORIAL

5 MORE HEROES OF THE FAITH - Gary A Clover
The two Methodist Maori missionaries martyred near
Mangataipa in the Hokianga in 1837

13 A DAY IN MY LIFE AT GOLDIE COLLEGE
in the early 1990s
- Kath Kerr

17 'A REAL GOOD, SENSIBLE CHRISTIAN WOMAN ...'
-
Lynne McDonald

30 HYMN-WRITER CHARLES WESLEY - Alison Fields

47 THE PRAYER OF FAITH CAN VINDICATE'
- Anthony Tedeschi
Two Wesley Letters in the Alfred & Isabel Reed Collection

REVIEWS
55
KNOWLEDGE & VITAL PIETY - Susan J Thompson
Education for Methodist ministry in New Zealand
from the 1840s
Reviewed by Frank Hanson

60 UNTO THE ENDS OF THE EARTH
- Len and Hilda Schroeder
Reviewed by Graham Whaley

62 THE STORY OF GEORGE LOVELESS AND THE
TOLPUDDLE MARTYRS - Andrew Norman
Reviewed by Terry Wall

Editorial

This edition of the Journal continues to share with the church the research of Gary Clover into early Maori Methodist martyrs, who offered their lives in the service of the gospel. His investigations uncover stories that have not been well known and it is hoped that the current generation of Methodists will find them rich and inspiring.

Kath Kerr writes of her experience as a missionary teacher in the Solomon Islands in the 1990s. Her account is vivid, revealing the challenges faced by those in this form of service. Lynne McDonald, recipient of the Wesley Historical Society's Gilmore Smith Scholarship, makes available the fruits of her enquiry into the ministries that women offered on the Island ofChoiseuI, in the Solomons.

Alison Fields considers the hymns of Charles Wesley as a literary form that reveals the theology of the Methodist movement in the eighteenth century. The hymn, she argues, can be just as revealing of theology as the sermon or theological discourse. Letters by the Wesley brothers held in the Alfred & Isabel Reed Collection in Dunedin are examined by Anthony Tedeschi. He draws attention to their context and provides valuable background material.

We are grateful to Frank Hanson for his review of Susan Thompson's Knowledge & Vital Piety. He confirms that the work goes to the heart of the matter and suggests that where the balance should be struck between knowledge and piety becomes the debate.

Graham Whaley reviews Unto the Ends of the Earth, Len and Hilda Schroeder's account of their mission work in Botswana. My own contribution is a review of Andrew Norman's recent book on the Tolpuddle Martyrs. His book provides a fascinating introduction to Methodists becoming engaged in social justice issues in the 1830s.

We are glad to note Laurie Guy's important work Shaping Godzone: Public Issues and Church Voices in New Zealand 1840-2000. We are pleased to record that Honoured Member of the Society Allan Davidson has edited two significant works published in 2011, Living Legacy: A History of the Anglican Diocese of Auckland, and A Controversial Churchman: Essays on George Selwyn, Bishop of New Zealand and Lichfield, and Sarah Selwyn.

- Terry Wall