FIND A CHURCH

The Methodist Connexional Office is located at:

Weteriana House
50 Langdons Road
Papanui
Christchurch 8053

Postal address
:

PO Box 931, Christchurch 8140

T. (03) 366 6049   I. 0800 266 639

Please phone our main line (as above) and at the prompt either dial '0' to speak to Reception or enter an extension number. FOR A LIST OF EXTENSIONS CLICK HERE

Email the Webmaster
Email the Connexional Office

Go to the Wesley Historical Society Home Page

Journal 1996 - Wesley Historical Society

Go to Wesley Historical Society Publications

CONTENTS

JOURNAL 1996 OnLine

EDITORIAL

FOUR BIOGRAPHIES - Verna E MOSSONG

LIST OF PRESIDENTS OF THE PRIMITIVE
METHODIST CHURCH OF
NEW ZEALAND

LETTERS to the EDITOR

THE GOVERNOR GENERAL AND A PRIMITIVE
METHODIST HERITAGE -
D BURT

A MINISTRY IN AVIATION RESEARCH

OBITUARIES

Main Articles

PRIMITIVE METHODISM IN NEW ZEALAND :
SESQUICENTENARY
OnLine
-
I J WHYLE

FROM MOW COP TO AIREDALE STREET OnLine
-
Donald PHILLIPPS

REMEMBER THE PRIMITIVE METHODISTS OnLine
- Verna E MOSSONG

A TRIBUTE TO HOME MISSIONARIES OnLine
- Marcia and Fred BAKER

THE CHURCH BY THE AIRPORT OnLine
-
Richard WAUGH

EDITORIAL


Although it is only 83 years since the union of 1913, the "Prims" are largely forgotten. The living links are gone and the archives are deficient. Therefore the main essays here become, in themselves, a major resource. The photographs alone are a fascinating collection, many accessible for the first time. Fortunately the Kinder Library holds a set of the New Zealand Primitive Methodist. That magazine itself reflects the history of printing technology: no illustration followed by occasional engravings, and then occasional photographs. Only finally were photographs common. Here is a selection to support and add to the text. The new technology is changing rapidly.

Very few of the Primitive buildings still remain. Some important nes have sunk almost without trace! With the people gone, the buildings gone, the church organisation voluntarily dying at the time of Union that a new church might live, what now is left? Each community needs to answer that for itself and at the very least rediscover the story.

New Plymouth, the founding city, held a sesquicentennial service but did not develop the local story. Auckland did both and also mounted an historical display. What did other places do? This issue should stir them to search their own story. They owe that to the minority "Prims". The Preaching Plans systematically recorded in the New Zealand Primitive Methodist are a starting point.

The union of 1896 was only partial. Neither the Wesleyan majority nor the Primitive minority was ready to compromise. But in 1913 they did a deal. The Wesleyans let in lay representation at Conference; the Primitives gave up some of the lay representatiopn they had had. The new structure was to be democratic. More or less - according to the viewpoint.

If most of the Primitive style has gone, not only by assimilation, but by social, economic and religious change, there is still that democratic structure of the highest court. That is an enduring legacy.